Research Staff & Students

  • Lionel Arteaga

    Lionel Arteaga

    Postdoctoral Research Associate

    Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences
     CMI Science
     laaq@princeton.edu

    My research focuses on the interaction of marine ecosystems and biogeochemical cycles in the Southern Ocean. I use bio-optical and chemical data from autonomous floats in combination with satellite and biogeochemical models in order to understand the processes driving the uptake and export of carbon in the Southern Ocean.

  • Karl W. Bandilla

    Karl W. Bandilla

    Associate Professional Specialist

    Civil and Environmental Engineering
     CMI Technology
     bandilla@princeton.edu

    Current research involves numerical modeling of the movement of COand brine in storage formations. Specifically working on dynamic pressure reconstruction and active pressure management using brine production wells.

  • Megan Bartlett

    Megan Bartlett

    Postdoctoral Fellow

    Princeton Environmental Institute
     CMI Science
     megankb@princeton.edu

    Bartlett’s research interests include Ecosystem responses to climate change, vegetation impacts on the global carbon cycle, plant physiology, and plant drought tolerance.

  • Kieran Bhatia

    Kieran Bhatia

    Postdoctoral Research Associate

    Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences
     CMI Science
     kbhatia@princeton.edu

    Kieran started as a postdoctoral research associate at Princeton University in April 2016. The main focus of his research is to better understand the effects of climate change on tropical cyclones. Specifically, he is analyzing the mechanisms by which global warming is leading to substantially more intense hurricanes in GFDL’s coupled HiFLOR model.

  • Seth Bushinsky

    Seth Bushinsky

    Postdoctoral Research Associate

    Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences
     CMI Science
     sb17@princeton.edu

    Seth studies biogeochemical cycling in the ocean, focusing on the production and export of organic matter from the surface ocean.  In his research, he uses observations from profiling floats and simple conceptual models to separate the biological and physical terms that influence oxygen and carbon in the Southern Ocean.

  • Salvatore Calabrese

    Salvatore Calabrese

    Graduate Student

    Civil and Environmental Engineering
     CMI Technology
     sc58@princeton.edu

    My research focuses on the interaction between the hydrologic cycle and soil biogeochemical reactions across a wide range of timescales. I develop theoretical models to link the hydrologic fluxes to biochemical reaction in order to improve our understanding of natural ecosystems and, ultimately, to minimize the impact of anthropogenic activities.

  • Cleo Chou

    Cleo Chou

    Postdoctoral Research Associate

    Princeton Environmental Institute
     CMI Science
     cleochou@princeton.edu

    Cleo is interested in forest dynamics, nutrient and carbon cycles, tropical forest ecology, and the role of biodiversity, species traits, and ecological competition in these topics. She is working with the Earth System Model at NOAA GFDL to understand nutrient limitation of the terrestrial carbon sink, with a focus on tropical forests.

  • Romain Darnajoux

    Romain Darnajoux

    Postdoctoral researcher in Biogeochemistry

    Geosciences
     CMI Science
     romaind@princeton.edu

    I am interested in the effects and interactions of biotic and abiotic parameters on biological nitrogen fixation at different organization level, from enzymes to ecosystems. My work will ultimately help to better constrain nitrogen input and carbon accumulation capacity in important ecosystems, such as the boreal forest and coastal sediment.

  • Paul Gauthier

    Paul Gauthier

    Postdoctoral Research Associate

    Geosciences
     CMI Science
     ppg@princeton.edu

    Paul joined Prof. Michael Bender’s research team in December 2012 to apply oxygen isotopes to measure respiration in the light in leaves. After receiving a PhD from Paris Sud University, France, in 2010, he moved to the Australian National University, Australia to investigate the impact of drought on plants carbon balance with a high focus on respiration.

  • Samantha Hartzell

    Samantha Hartzell

    Graduate Student

    Civil and Environmental Engineering
     CMI Technology
     srh2@princeton.edu

    My research focuses on ecohydrology. In particular, I study how plant water use strategies improve resilience to environmental stress and variability. One of these strategies is CAM photosynthesis, used by cacti and air plants in many water limited ecosystems. A current research project involves an investigation of the tradeoffs between CAM and other photosynthetic pathways.

  • Jian He

    Jian He

    Postdoctoral Research Associate

    Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences
     CMI Science
     jianhe@princeton.edu

    Current research focuses on the quantifying the contribution of individual sources and sinks to atmospheric methane variability by incorporating methane isotopes into the chemical mechanism in GFDL’s ESM4.

  • Robert Key

    Robert Key

    Research Oceanographer

    Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences
     CMI Science
     key@princeton.edu

    Global scale oceanographic issues related to climate change: assembling fully-calibrated high-quality data sets that could be used to address global biogeochemical issues and using radiocarbon to study oceanographic ventilation, meridional overturning circulation, and air-sea gas exchange.

  • Kevin W. Knehr

    Kevin W. Knehr

    Postdoctoral Research Associate

    Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering
     CMI Technology
     kevin.knehr@princeton.edu

    Dr. Kevin Knehr is a Postdoctoral Research Associate in Prof. Daniel A. Steingart’s lab at Princeton University. He has a B.S. in Mechanical Engineering from Drexel University and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Chemical Engineering from Columbia University. He has extensive experience in the modeling and experimental characterization of complex electrochemical systems.

  • Ayumi Koishi

    Ayumi Koishi

    Postdoctoral Research Associate Civil and Environmental Engineering
     CMI Science
     akoishi@princeton.edu

    Ayumi's research uses lab-, synchrotron/neutron-, and simulation-based techniques to understand interfacial energetics, nucleation processes, and the dynamics of amorphous phases, particularly of calcium carbonate. Her current research interests extend to the nanoscale understanding of interaction between soil organic matter and clay minerals and their aggregation processes.

  • Yao Lai

    Yao Lai

    Graduate Student

    Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering
     CMI Technology
     chingyao@princeton.edu

    Yao’s research focuses on the experimental modeling of hydraulic fracturing. She investigates the process of fracturing fluid flowing back to the surface from the underground fractures once the injection pressure is removed and the fracturing fluid permanently trapped underground due to the rock heterogeneity. Recently Yao has been working on a new technique in which foam is injected as a fracturing fluid to reduce the water use and the damage to water-sensitive reservoirs in hydraulic fracturing.

  • Ying Liu

    Ying Liu

    Graduate Student

    Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering
     CMI Technology
     yl6@princeton.edu

    Ying’s research interests lie in CO2 sequestration and energy-saving materials. Her current projects involve the capillary effects on the CO2flow in porous media and the longevity of liquid-infused surfaces for drag reduction purposes.

  • Katja E. Luxem

    Katja E. Luxem

    Graduate Student

    Geosciences
     CMI Science
     kluxem@princeton.edu

    Microbes are the world’s greatest chemists! My goal is to better understand how these tiny forms of life interact with and change our environment. In my Ph.D. research, I am studying how physiological constraints (like electrons, energy, and light) control the activity of the enzyme nitrogenase, which converts inert nitrogen gas into nutritious and fertilizing ammonium. Understanding what controls nitrogenase activity can help us determine when and where microbes are producing fertilizer naturally, knowledge that can be manipulated to our advantage in the long run.

  • Anne Morel-Kraepiel

    Anne Morel-Kraepiel

    Research Scholar

    Chemistry
     CMI Science
     kraepiel@princeton.edu

    Investigations at the molecular level how metals, as essential part of metalloenzymes, catalyze key processes in biogeochemical cycles, how they are acquired by organisms, and how they are themselves cycled in the environment; effect of metal (Fe, Mo, V) availability on nitrogen inputs to ecosystems through nitrogen fixation.

  • Tom Postma

    Tom Postma

    Graduate Student

    Civil and Environmental Engineering
     CMI Technology
     tpostma@princeton.edu

    Tom’s research involves numerical modeling and simulation of CO2 sequestration in deep saline aquifers, with an emphasis on quantifying leakage risks. Before coming to Princeton, Tom obtained a BSc in chemical engineering and an MSc in petroleum engineering at Delft University of Technology, the Netherlands.

  • Bhargav Rallabandi

    Postdoctoral Research Associate

    Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering
     CMI Technology
     vbr@princeton.edu

    My research focuses on the mechanics of sea ice and its role in climate and ecology. My approach is to develop reduced-order theoretical models that isolate the fundamental physical phenomena at play. I am currently interested in ice bridge formation in straits, which shares several similarities with the flow of dense granular media and yield stress fluids. I also enjoy thinking more generally about the role of fluid flow and elasticity in industrial, geophysical and biological systems.

  • Brandon Reichl

    Brandon Reichl

    Postdoctoral Research Associate

    Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences
     CMI Science
     breichl@princeton.edu

    Reichl studies the interaction between ocean surface gravity waves and upper ocean processes. One aspect that he is particularly focused on at present is the interaction between waves and upper-ocean turbulent vertical mixing (via Langmuir turbulence) and its application to coupled weather and climate simulations.

  • Keith Rodgers

    Keith Rodgers

    Associate Research Scholar

    Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences
     CMI Science
     krodgers@princeton.edu

    Using models to identify and understand dynamical controls on seasonal interannual to decadal variability in the carbon cycle.

  • Sarah Ann Schlunegger

    Sarah Ann Schlunegger

    Graduate Student

    Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences
     CMI Science
     sas452@princeton.edu

    Research Focus: Using climate models and observations to understand how anthropogenic climate change will interact with the oceans ability to uptake atmospheric carbon over the coming decades to centuries.

  • Suin Shim

    Suin Shim

    Postdoctoral Research Associate

    Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering
     CMI Technology
     sshim@princeton.edu

    Experimental studies of the dissolution of bubbles of carbon dioxide during flow in microfluidic channels; Comparisons of the dissolution rates with of the dissolution process, including influences of the background flow.

  • Sampo Smolander

    Sampo Smolander

    Associate Research Scholar

    Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory
    , Princeton Environmental Institute
     CMI Science
     sampos@princeton.edu

    Dr. Sampo Smolander works with soil microbes, biogeochemistry and wetlands methane emissions in the land component of the GFDL climate model. He has degrees in biology and applied mathematics from University of Helsinki, Finland.

  • Yiheng Tao

    Yiheng Tao

    Graduate Student

    Civil and Environmental Engineering
     CMI Technology
     yihengt@princeton.edu

    Yiheng’s research interests lie in the fields of climate change mitigation, renewable energy, and environmental fluid mechanics. Currently, Yiheng focuses on geologic carbon sequestration and is developing vertically integrated models for CO2 migration in fractured rocks. The results can be used to more accurately assess the feasibility of storing large amount of carbon dioxide in geological formations. Yiheng has Bachelor’s degrees in CEE and Economics from University of California, Berkeley.

  • Anna Trugman

    Anna Trugman

    Graduate Student

    Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences
     CMI Science
     att@princeton.edu

    Interactions between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere; impacts of climate on seasonal and long term carbon dynamics in high latitude forests; forest recovery from disturbance; forest seasonality.

  • Marco D. Visser

    Marco D. Visser

    Postdoctoral Research Associate

    Princeton Environmental Institute
     CMI Science
     mvisser@princeton.edu

    My interests lie at the intersection of empirical and theoretical ecology: confronting theory with empirical data. Generally, my work has one overarching theme: linking ecological patterns across spatio-temporal scales, and levels of biological organization (e.g. trophic level or life-stage). Research topics include disentangling the major demographic processes that structure tropical communities; evolution of reproductive strategies; and advancing computational, mathematical and statistical methodology in ecology and biology.

  • Emily Wei-Hsin Sun

    Emily Wei-Hsin Sun

    Graduate Student

    Civil and Environmental Engineering
     CMI Technology
     esun@princeton.edu

    Using molecular dynamics simulations and nano- to micro- scale analytical techniques, Emily’s research looks at mechanisms underlying multiphase fluid flow and soil carbon stabilization at mineral interfaces. These fundamental interactions lie at the heart of our predictive understanding of geologic carbon sequestration and soil carbon cycle dynamics.

  • Jennifer A. Willemsen

    Jennifer A. Willemsen

    Graduate Student

    Civil and Environmental Engineering
     CMI Technology
     jarw@princeton.edu

    Jennifer is interested in the geochemical interactions between emerging organic contaminants, soil organic matter, and clay minerals. Her research combines molecular dynamics simulations and experimental work. Prior to joining the Bourg lab, Jennifer received a B.S. in chemistry from Haverford College.

  • Jared Wilmoth

    Jared Wilmoth

    Postdoctoral Research Associate

    Geosciences
    , Princeton Environmental Institute
     CMI Science
     jwilmoth@princeton.edu

    Dr. Jared Wilmoth studies geological chemistry and microbiology using high-resolution chemical and molecular characterization techniques. The major focus of his experimental research is on investigating and understanding how microbial/environmental interfaces regulate greenhouse gas emissions from wetland and peat soils that undergo dynamic redox oscillations. He earned his PhD in Soil Science (biogeochemistry) from the University of Georgia, Athens Georgia, USA and has completed postdoctoral research at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN, USA in the Biological and Nanoscale Systems Group, Biosciences Division.

  • Jun Yin

    Jun Yin

    Postdoctoral Research Associate

    Civil and Environmental Engineering
     CMI Technology
     jy12@princeton.edu

    My research is focused on the exchange of water and energy among soil, plants, and atmosphere. Models across different temporal and spatial scales are used to quantify the ecohydrological processes and atmospheric convection, particularly the dynamics of soil water content, atmospheric boundary layer, and clouds.

  • Lei Zhao

    Lei Zhao

    Postdoctoral Research Associate

    Woodrow Wilson School
     CMI Integration
     lei.zhao@princeton.edu

    Lei’s research concerns the states, patterns and principles that govern the radiation, momentum, heat and water transfer between land and the atmosphere over heterogeneous terrestrial systems including both natural and built-up landscapes.

  • Lailai Zhu

    Lailai Zhu

    Postdoctoral researcher

    Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering
     CMI Technology
     lzhu@princeton.edu

    Lailai develops and utilizes a variety of computational tools to investigate the flow phenomenon. His research interests include fluid-structure interactions, micro and multiphase flow motivated for human healthcare problems. He is also conducting theoretical/computational studies on the formation and distribution of sea ice.